Robots tunisia coronavirus military lockdown

Robots tunisia coronavirus military lockdown

A soldier stands in downtown Tunis on March 24, after Tunisia’s president ordered the army to patrol the streets and enforce a public curfew from 6 pm to 6 am to stop the spread of coronavirus.

Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters


  • Governments worldwide are taking innovative approaches to slow the spread of the coronavirus — including modifying robots to aid in hospitals.
  • Some of those methods, however, are also jarring.
  • Some countries, like Taiwan, Poland, and Singapore, are tracking citizens through geo-location services on mobile phones.
  • Other countries, like Tunisia, are imposing harsher lockdowns — including a 6 pm to 6 am public curfew enforced by military.
  • Here’s a roundup of some of the ways countries are fighting the virus.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories

Robots Taiwan is rolling out an “electronic fence” strategy that utilizes location-tracking services in mobile phones to ensure people who are quarantined stay in their homes.

Robots People wear face masks to protect against the spread of the coronavirus as they pray at the popular Longshan Temple in Taipei, Taiwan, Thursday, March 12, 2src2src. (AP Photo   Chiang Ying ying)

People wear face masks to protect against the spread of the coronavirus as they pray at the popular Longshan Temple in Taipei, Taiwan, Thursday, March 12, 2020.

Chiang Ying-ying/AP Photo


Source: Reuters

Robots Poland is asking citizens to download a government app called “Home Quarantine,” and respond to the app’s random requests for geo-located selfies when prompted. The police will be alerted if a user fails to comply within 20 minutes.

Robots Poland border coronavirus

A Polish police officer, wearing a protective mask, stands at the border between Germany and Poland on March 23, during coronavirus disease symptoms testing for people returning to Poland.

REUTERS/Axel Schmidt/File Photo


Source: Business Insider

Robots South Korea has developed “phone booths” where individuals — even those without symptoms — can get tested for coronavirus in seven minutes through a glass wall, allowing for fast, widespread testing.

Robots Coronavirus South Korea

South Korean soldiers wearing protective gear walk on a street in front of Daegu’s city hall after the rapid rise in confirmed cases of the coronavirus on March 2, 2020.

REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon


Source: The Straits Times, New York Times

Robots Singapore is using a surveillance app as well, but uses location services to identify whether or not people have been in close proximity to coronavirus patients.

Robots singapore coronavirus train travel masks

Commuters wearing masks in precaution of the coronavirus outbreak are pictured in a train during their morning commute in Singapore February 18, 2020.

REUTERS/Edgar Su


Source: Business Insider, Business Insider

Robots Singapore also requires all travelers get their temperature taken, along with people entering high trafficked locations like schools and restaurants.

Robots singapore covid 19 temperature screening

A man wearing a protective facemask walks past a temperature screening check at Changi International airport in Singapore on February 27, 2020.

Roslan Rahman/AFP via Getty Images


Source: STAT

Robots Some hospitals in Thailand are using modified “ninja robots” to help with the treatment of coronavirus patients. The wheeled robots can take patients’ temperatures and are equipped with a screen, allowing doctors to video chat with patients and minimize risk of exposure.

Robots GettyImages 12src764src985

The creation is called a “ninja robot” because of its black coloring.

Photo by LILLIAN SUWANRUMPHA/AFP via Getty Images


Source: Business Insider

Robots Other countries like Tunisia are instituting harsher public curfews. From 6 pm to 6 am each day, police officers and military personnel patrol the streets to ensure no one leaves their homes.

Robots tunisia coronavirus military lockdown

A soldier stands in downtown Tunis on March 24, after Tunisia’s president ordered the army to patrol the streets and enforce lockdowns to stop the spread of coronavirus.

Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters


Source: New York Times

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