Robots GettyImages 12153515src1

Robots GettyImages 12153515src1

Italian police officer flying a drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


  • Italy has been one of the hardest-hit countries by the coronavirus pandemic, with more than 11,000 deaths, the most of any country.
  • The country has been put on lockdown, and police are now using drones to monitor movement.
  • The coronavirus outbreak that originated in China has killed more than 39,000 people worldwide and infected more than 803,000, according to recent totals.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As of Tuesday, COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has infected more than 803,000 people worldwide, and has killed more than 39,000.

Italy has more cases than any country except the US, and it leads in deaths with 11,500 recorded. On March 9, Italy was put under a strict lockdown set to last three weeks and be lifted this Friday, although authorities now say it will likely be extended. 

Italian police are now using drones to monitor people’s movement and make sure that they’re following lockdown rules. Take a look.

Robots Italy’s lockdown is one of the strictest in Europe.

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Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Source: Business Insider

Robots At first the lockdown only applied to the northern Lombardy region, but the prime minister expanded it to cover all of Italy.

Robots GettyImages 121535144src

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots Citizens are required to stay home except for essential work or family reasons, and stores besides grocery stores and pharmacies are closed.

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Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots Only essential travel is allowed, and travelers must sign police documents about their reasons for travel. Police are also stopping cars for checks.

Robots GettyImages 1215351452

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots On March 23, the Italian Aviation Authority approved police requests for using drones for support.

Robots GettyImages 1215351498

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Source: Euronews

Robots Italy also called in its army to enforce the lockdown.

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Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots Drone pilots from the Italian Army Military Corps patrolled near Turin, Italy, on March 28, seen here.

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Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots The drones locate pedestrians and cars still moving around the city despite the lockdown.

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Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots Then, the police receive coordinates so they can track down people who are out and check them.

Robots GettyImages 1215351467

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots The Aviation Authority gave permission to use these drones through the initial lockdown order of April 3, though that could also be extended.

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Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots They are specifically for urban areas or smaller populations with increased risk.

Robots GettyImages 1215351455

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Source: Euronews

Robots Drones are restricted to under 25 kg — about 55 pounds — and there are limitations on airspace near airports.

Robots GettyImages 121535149src

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Robots The Italian Ministry of the Interior tweeted that by March 23, more than 90,000 people and 2,000 businesses had been reported for violating lockdown restrictions. About 60 million people are under lockdown orders in Italy.

Robots GettyImages 1215351428

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Source: Twitter

Robots One man in northern Italy was reportedly cited for violating lockdown to play “Pokémon Go.”

Robots GettyImages 1215351323

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Source: Business Insider

Robots Italians who break the rules could face up to a $232 fine and even six months in prison.

Robots GettyImages 12153513src7

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Source: CNN

Robots Health officials say that there are signs the lockdown is beginning to work, but that might be a reason to be “even stricter.”

Robots GettyImages 121535131src

Italian drone.

Photo by Stefano Guidi/Getty Images


Source: Business Insider

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