Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_1555srcx

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_1555srcx

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


  • Boston Dynamics’ four-legged robot, Spot, is being used in a Boston hospital to work with COVID-19 patients. 
  • The company has spent the past month building and testing ways for robots to protect healthcare workers.
  • Boston Dynamics says it will make the hardware and software open source so they can be used by other manufacturers as it works on developing more telemedicine and disinfecting robots. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The latest robot to join the fight against the coronavirus outbreak is Spot, Boston Dynamics’ four-legged, dog-like robot.

Spot has been used at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston for the past two weeks, according to a statement released Thursday. Boston Dynamics is a robotics company based in Boston that is known for its designs that mirror life-like movements that resemble people and animals leading to an uncanny valley effect that may make viewers uncomfortable.

Around the World, robots are being used to minimize the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, by taking food preparation jobs, performing medical intake exams, and even disinfecting entire cities.

More controversially, robots and drones have been used to enforce coronavirus lockdowns in some countries, and US police have started adopting them for outreach. 

Robots Spot robots are equipped with an iPad and two-way radio.

Robots 2src2srcsrc41src drspot v1 front.JPG

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


Robots Using this setup, doctors can talk to patients and evaluate their symptoms from afar, without having to put themselves at risk of exposure.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_15234x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots Before using the robots, patients with COVID-19 symptoms would line up to get assessments from healthcare providers in tents, which would require up to five members of medical staff to potentially be exposed to each patient.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_152src6x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots Boston Dynamics says that for every shift completed by a robot, at least one healthcare worker can decrease their exposure to coronavirus.

Robots 2src2srcsrc41src drspot v1 pitch.JPG

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


Robots Limiting exposure of healthcare workers also means that they can conserve PPE.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_15352x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots Boston area hospitals started reaching out to Boston Dynamics in early March asking for robots that could help minimize staff exposure to COVID-19.

Robots Spot   workshop

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


Robots Next, Boston Dynamics hopes to develop technology that will allow Spot robots to inspect patients’ vitals.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_15297x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots They’re working on ways for Spot to measure body temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate, and oxygen saturation.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_1555srcx

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots Researchers think thermal cameras could be used to take temperatures and respiratory rates, and external cameras could potentially measure changes in blood vessel contraction to find pulse rate

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_15src44x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots Boston Dynamics is making the software and hardware designs for this telemedicine robot open source, so other manufacturers can apply them.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_15756x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots The company said it made both more generalizable, so they can be used on robots not designed by Boston Dynamics.

Robots 2src2srcsrc41src drspot v1 side.JPG

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


Robots They’re using Spot for triage medical situations, like in tents or parking lots…

Robots 2src2srcsrc41src drspot v1 right.JPG

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


Robots …but the company noted that other kinds of mobile robots, like those on wheels, might be better for this situation.

Robots 2src2srcsrc41src drspot v1 iso.JPG

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


Robots They’re also in the early stages of equipping Spot for disinfection.

Robots 2src2srcsrc41src drspot v1 left.JPG

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


Robots Boston Dynamics says that with a UV-C light attached, Spot could be used to disinfect hospitals, or other public spaces like subway stations.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_15591x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots In GitHub, Boston Dynamics also references a possible use of the robot for delivery within the hospital, though it’s still in the prototype phase.

Robots WALKER_src4232src_robot_15181x

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Joanne Rathe Strohmeyer/The Boston Globe


Robots The document says that Spot could use a 3D-printed tray to carry supplies like food and medicine to patients in isolation, further protecting healthcare workers.

Robots Spot   front2

Boston Dynamics Spot robot.

Spot® robot image provided courtesy of Boston Dynamics, Inc.


More:

Features
Tech
Boston Dynamics
Science

Chevron icon It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options.

Read More