Elon Musk Explains the Greatness of the SpaceX Super Heavy Starship, Space and Future

Elon Musk describes the various aspects of the greatness of the SpaceX Super Heavy Starship.

Elon Musk started the presentation at 6: 28 PST.

Elon Musk called the orbital prototype as the most inspiring thing he has ever seen.

The point of the presentation is to inspire the public and get people excited about space and the future.

Do we want to choose the future where we are on many World and exploring the stars? The critical breakthrough is to make space travel like air travel. We fly the airplane many time. We flew 747s about 30,000 to 100,000 times over its life. We fly them for decades and fly them pretty much every day.

He talked about the Falcon 1 and the problems recovering the first stage using a parachute. The first stage comes in at mach 10 and hits the atmosphere like a brick wall.

He reviewed the grasshopper and the Falcon 9.

He reviewed the Falcon Heavy. The first successful flight was only about 20 months ago.

They are changing the control of the re-entry SpaceX Super Heavy Starship to being more like a skydiver than an airplane.

The dry mass of the starship will be about 120 tons, but they hope to bring it down to 110 tons and maybe eventually to 90 tons.

The payload will start at about 110 tons and could reach 150 tons.

They will 3.5 tons for every ton of fuel.

The Starship will have 3 sea-level raptor engines that are gimballed. They move.


The Starship will have 3 vacuum raptor engines.

They have glass-like hexagonal heat shield tiles.

The 301 Stainless Steel was the best design decision. The steel is stronger at very cold and very hot temperatures. It is twice as strong at carbon fiber at cryo temperatures.

The cool side of the rocket needs no heatshield.

The windward side has far less heatshield. They only need to have the interface side of the tile to get to temperatures below the melting point of the steel. The steel has 1500C degree melting point.

$130,000 per ton of carbon fiber. $2500 per ton for the stainless steel.

Steel is easy to weld.

The steel could be cutup and modified and used for other things on Mars and the moon.

The Super Heavy booster will have 24 to 37 raptor engines. The number will depend upon the missions.

They will get to over 1.5 thrust to weight ratio.

Refueling in orbit is key to developing the moon and Mars. Here are scenes from the SpaceX Super Heavy Starship animation.

Refueling in orbit is actually easier than docking with the international space station.

Elon made his multi-planet pitch again.

There is a delay and then questions and answers with Elon.

They will not fly to orbit with the Mark 1. They will fly to orbit with the Mark 3. They will start building the Mark 3 in about three months.

They will start building the boosters in Florida and Texas as fast they can.


They are making improvements with each new item.

They will transition to hot gas thrusters around Mark 3. This will be a transition from an ISP of 60 to about 360.

They will have one seam welds with thinner metal in later versions. They will be able to build ships at an amazing rate compared to space industry standards.

Higher efficiency maneuvering thrusters will be able to move the ship without the main engines.

They will be pressure fed and will be able to fire from any angle and any Gs.

Starship will be able to fly single-stage from the moon to the Earth.

Less than 5% of the SpaceX resources were spent on the Starship prototype.

Most of the resources are on the Falcon, Dragon and Crew Dragon to meet obligations to NASA and others.

They did the work outside to avoid time constructing buildings.

Elon says, “If it is long it is wrong, and if it is tight it is right.” This is his management philosophy. The best design is to undesign. What did you delete. They iterate on speeding up their processes.

Long term they will produce methane fuel using solar power.

The main constraint on the Super-Heavy booster is ramping up the production of the Raptor engines.

They will need 100 Raptor engines to get to the orbital test. They build one Raptor engine currently every eight days. On 2 months they want to get to one Raptor engine every two days. By Q12020, they want to get to one engine every day. This means the orbital flight would not be until about March, 2020.

SpaceX wants to be able eventually refly boosters up to 20 times a day.


They will fly the Starship about 3-4 times a day. The orbital limitation is about the orbits. This would not be a limitation for a point to point version.

The fully reusable fleet of Super Heavy Starship will increase humanities launch capacity by 10000 times. This is max theoretical.

With 20 rockets you could put 3 million tons per year into orbit.

Less than one year to start from the steel design to the current state. Four months to start building the orbital prototype to the current state.

Tesla’s will be able to operate on Mars. They need no oxygen.


They will bring boring machines to mine water, get materials for bricks and build underground bases.

Mission Accomplished- Elon Musk inspired people about space and the future.

SOURCES- SpaceX, Elon Musk


Written By Brian Wang, Nextbigfuture.com

Space exploration Alexei Leonov, First Person to Walk in Space, Dies at 85

Space exploration

space exploration
Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov trains for the Apollo-Soyuz mission in April 1975 . (Credit: NASA)

Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, the first
person to walk in space, has died at the age of 85 at the Burdenko Military
Hospital in Moscow. His death was announced Friday, Oct. 11, by Roscosmos,
Russia’s space agency.

Born in 1934, Leonov became the eleventh Soviet
cosmonaut and achieved major milestones of space exploration. During the
Voskhod 2 mission, on March 18, 1965, he exited his capsule for 12 minutes,
performing the first human spacewalk. Leonov barely survived the excursion,
after a malfunction with his suit forced him to drop its pressure in order to
make his way back into the capsule.

“His name is lettered in gold in the World’s
space exploration history,” Roscosmos said in a statement.

In July 1975, Leonov commanded the Soyuz
capsule, which set a standard of international cooperation in space when it
docked for two days with NASA’s Apollo capsule.

“We need heroes like him,” says Garik
Israelian, an astronomer at the Institute for Astrophysics in Tenerife, Spain,
and founder of the Starmus International Festival, an international gathering
that celebrates science and the arts. Israelian, a close friend of Leonov, says
that Leonov’s experience on the Soyuz-Apollo mission shaped his life.

He recalls Leonov telling him, “Space is a
place for freedom, not weapons. We should collaborate and work together.”

An artist as well as a cosmonaut, Leonov took
colored pencils altered for zero gravity with him on Voskhod 2, and sketched an
orbital sunrise, which is considered the first piece of art created in space.
In collaboration with Starmus, Leonov helped to create the Stephen Hawking
Medal for Science Communication, which recognizes the work of those helping to
promote public awareness of science.

Israelian recalls Leonov creating a sketch of
Hawking in his hotel room and presenting it to him. The form of the medal
itself was inspired by Leonov’s drawing, his first spacewalk and the home-built
electric guitar of Queen band member and astrophysicist Brian May. Winners
include Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Hans Zimmer, Brian Eno, Buzz Aldrin and
Jean-Michel Jarre.

Leonov was inducted into the International Air
and Space Hall of Fame in San Diego in 2000. He was portrayed in the 2017 film,
“Spacewalk,” which premiered at Starmus 4 in Trondheim, Norway. He and U.S.
astronaut David Scott co-authored the dual autobiography, “Two Sides of the
Moon: Our Story of the Cold War Space Race,” which explores the space race from
both sides of the Iron Curtain.

A visitation will be held in Leonov’s honor in
Moscow on Tuesday, Oct. 15.

Space exploration Chandrayaan 2: NASA to capture Vikram’s landing site on Moon again – The Financial Express

Space exploration

Space exploration ISRO’s Chandrayaan 2 Update: The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) of NASA has been circling the moon since 2009 and will pass over the landing location of Vikram Lander again on October 14 and make another attempt to spot ISRO’s landing module.

Chandrayaan 2: The Vikram Lander was set to land between the Moon’s crater Manzinus C and Simpelius N on September 7.

Chandrayaan 2 News: As informed by the American Space agency NASA, its spacecraft flew over the landing location of India’s Vikram lander of Chandrayaan 2 Mission. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) of NASA passed over the location where Vikram lander module of India’s Chandrayaan 2 Moon Mission was supposed to have landed but was unable to locate the missing spacecraft. The LRO, which is NASA’s Moon-orbiter has been circling the Moon since 2009. NASA has informed that it will make another attempt to spot the Vikram Lander and will fly over its landing location again on October 14. The dusk before the beginning of the lunar night in the landing region of the Moon made the job tougher for the LRO as the low light and shadows did not allow proper investigation. There are possibilities that the Vikram Lander might be lying in the shadows of Craters in the region.

A statement available on the official webpage of LROC (LRO Camera) states, “The LRO passed over the landing site of Vikram Lander on September 17 and acquired a set of high-resolution images of the region. The LROC team has not been able to identify or spot the Vikram Lander in the images so far.” Notably, the official webpage of LROC is handled by a team at Arizona State University.

The images which have been released by NASA are very high-resolution images of the landing sites. One of the pics captured by the LRO covers a 150-km swathe of the landing territory of Vikram Lander.

READ | Planned for six months, India’s Mars mission Mangalyaan completes five years: ISRO chief

Earlier, the moon-lander of India’s Chandrayaan 2 had failed to make a soft landing on the Lunar surface as ISRO lost contact with it. The Vikram lander was just 2.1 km above the Moon when it noted a deflection in its scheduled lunar descent flight path. ISRO’s moon-lander was unable to slow itself down at the rate required to make a safe landing. Seconds later at around 0153 hours IST, when the Vikram lander was merely 335 metres above the Moon’s surface, it stopped responding and ISRO lost contact with it. The lander would have been travelling at a speed of more than 200 km per hour when it lost contact with the ground station as suggested by experts.

A report published in IE suggested that The Orbiter of Chandrayaan 2 makes several revolutions of the Moon in a single day.

The Vikram lander and Pragyan Rover were designed to function only for 14 Earth-days or 1 Lunar day, following its scheduled lunar touchdown on September 7. ISRO was aware of the fact that a 14-Earth-day long lunar night will follow after the Lander and Rover modules have worked for 14-Earth-day(1 lunar day) in case of a successful landing. With the Lunar night descending on the Moon, the temperatures dip drastically to as low as minus 200 degrees Celsius in the area where Vikram was set to land. The disastrously cold temperatures will certainly cause immense damage to the electronics on the instruments of the Vikram Lander as they were were not designed to withstand such extremely low temperatures.

NASA has affirmed that it will be taking more images in October during a flyby in much favourable lighting conditions.

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    Space exploration Alexei Leonov, First Person to Walk in Space, Dies at 85

    Space exploration

    space exploration
    Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov trains for the Apollo-Soyuz mission in April 1975 . (Credit: NASA)

    Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, the first
    person to walk in space, has died at the age of 85 at the Burdenko Military
    Hospital in Moscow. His death was announced Friday, Oct. 11, by Roscosmos,
    Russia’s space agency.

    Born in 1934, Leonov became the eleventh Soviet
    cosmonaut and achieved major milestones of space exploration. During the
    Voskhod 2 mission, on March 18, 1965, he exited his capsule for 12 minutes,
    performing the first human spacewalk. Leonov barely survived the excursion,
    after a malfunction with his suit forced him to drop its pressure in order to
    make his way back into the capsule.

    “His name is lettered in gold in the World’s
    space exploration history,” Roscosmos said in a statement.

    In July 1975, Leonov commanded the Soyuz
    capsule, which set a standard of international cooperation in space when it
    docked for two days with NASA’s Apollo capsule.

    “We need heroes like him,” says Garik
    Israelian, an astronomer at the Institute for Astrophysics in Tenerife, Spain,
    and founder of the Starmus International Festival, an international gathering
    that celebrates science and the arts. Israelian, a close friend of Leonov, says
    that Leonov’s experience on the Soyuz-Apollo mission shaped his life.

    He recalls Leonov telling him, “Space is a
    place for freedom, not weapons. We should collaborate and work together.”

    An artist as well as a cosmonaut, Leonov took
    colored pencils altered for zero gravity with him on Voskhod 2, and sketched an
    orbital sunrise, which is considered the first piece of art created in space.
    In collaboration with Starmus, Leonov helped to create the Stephen Hawking
    Medal for Science Communication, which recognizes the work of those helping to
    promote public awareness of science.

    Israelian recalls Leonov creating a sketch of
    Hawking in his hotel room and presenting it to him. The form of the medal
    itself was inspired by Leonov’s drawing, his first spacewalk and the home-built
    electric guitar of Queen band member and astrophysicist Brian May. Winners
    include Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Hans Zimmer, Brian Eno, Buzz Aldrin and
    Jean-Michel Jarre.

    Leonov was inducted into the International Air
    and Space Hall of Fame in San Diego in 2000. He was portrayed in the 2017 film,
    “Spacewalk,” which premiered at Starmus 4 in Trondheim, Norway. He and U.S.
    astronaut David Scott co-authored the dual autobiography, “Two Sides of the
    Moon: Our Story of the Cold War Space Race,” which explores the space race from
    both sides of the Iron Curtain.

    A visitation will be held in Leonov’s honor in
    Moscow on Tuesday, Oct. 15.