Newly launched Black Film Archive provides history and context to more than 200 Black films made from 1915-1979 and currently streaming

Published by
Chicago Tribune

If you saw the most recent incarnation of “Candyman” from director Nia DaCosta — all of it shot in Chicago, some of which takes place amid the remaining Cabrini row houses — you might be compelled to go back and compare how other films have captured the same neighborhood. Namely 1975′s “Cooley High,” about a group of Black teenagers in the ‘60s, bonded by camaraderie, good times and (by the film’s end) rising tensions as they stare down the final weeks of their senior year of high school. The script is from “Good Times” and “What’s Happening!!” creator Eric Monte, and the story is loosely auto… Read More “Newly launched Black Film Archive provides history and context to more than 200 Black films made from 1915-1979 and currently streaming”

Steve Hummer: ‘Patty Ice’ Cantlay emerges as man to catch at Tour Championship

Published by
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

ATLANTA — First thing to know about Patrick Cantlay, your Tour Championship front-runner at East Lake this week, is that he is a man of the people. This year, the PGA Tour began something called the Player Impact Program (PIP), in which the top 10 most popular players (ranked in terms of various social media, internet search and branding metrics) would get a share of a $40 million bonus. Because if there is one thing popular professional golfers need, it’s more money. Cantlay’s not likely to cash in on any kind of popularity contest. After all, he seems to go into an emotional deep freeze on t… Read More “Steve Hummer: ‘Patty Ice’ Cantlay emerges as man to catch at Tour Championship”

Here Are the Most Unique Flows From Rappers Over the Last Five Years

Published by
XXL Mag

Being a rapper has a lot of moving parts. As an artist, they have to sharpen their ear for beats, figure out what they want to rap about, piece together hooks sometimes and, most importantly, find out how they want to flow. The use of flow to deliver bars, from the rhythms to cadences, is the reason why certain rappers are able to stand out amongst the crowd. Having a great flow is the skill that can elevate an average rapper to a highly talented one. If they get lucky, they’ll have other artists trying to emulate what they do, and spin it in a totally different way. Modern hip-hop has a lot o… Read More “Here Are the Most Unique Flows From Rappers Over the Last Five Years”

Google To Pay Apple $15 Billion To Remain Safari’s Default Search Engine

Published by
ValueWalk

Google – Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ:GOOGL) – is forecast to pay Apple Inc (NASDAQ:AAPL) approximately $15 billion to be the default search engine on the Safari web browser. Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Friendly AnimosityAccording to Bernstein analysts, the agreement is secret and the details and its extension are unknown. However, they have forecast that Google will have to splash the enormous sum this year, and $20 billion next year. This is a well-known Google tactic to make its search engine the top choice in all web browsers. For instance, Mozilla Firefox has still survived p… Read More “Google To Pay Apple $15 Billion To Remain Safari’s Default Search Engine”

Artificial intelligent Belgian rail tests sensors to keep workers apart during COVID-19

Artificial intelligent

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Belgium’s railways are testing smart cameras with sensors to ensure its workers wear masks and maintain their distance to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

From next week, so-called intelligent cameras will be installed in five strategic points in the offices of Belgian rail infrastructure operator Infrabel, where technicians would normally come together, such as the cafeteria.

A warning will sound if people are too numerous, do not have a face mask or get too close.

“We must ensure that our staff complies with the various social distancing guidelines. This is why we are setting up a number of devices based on artificial intelligence,” Benoit Gilson, Infrabel’s strategy director, told Reuters on Monday.

Using AI software available online, Infrabel said it had developed a way to interpret camera images for the purpose of COVID-19 protection. The company will employ an algorithm to calculate if workers are too close or wearing a face mask.

In a demonstration on Monday, staff seen on camera were shown on a giant screen as stick figures whose distance apart could be measured in metres. On another screen, a camera detected if a worker entering a room was wearing a mask.

“The whole issue of distance (between individuals) is (managed by) a mathematical model that we developed,” said Daniel Degueldre, head of Infrabel’s information technology team.

The company, which has 11,000 employees, said it had already been working on ways to use sensors to protect technicians working on the Belgian railways by placing cameras on helmets that would alert staff in an accident.

That know-how was reappraised to fight coronavirus.

Responsible for Belgium’s 3,602 km (2,238 miles) of rail lines, Infrabel manages one of the World’s most dense rail networks.

Writing by Robin Emmott; Editing by Giles Elgood

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Artificial intelligent Belgian rail tests sensors to keep workers apart during COVID-19

Artificial intelligent

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Belgium’s railways are testing smart cameras with sensors to ensure its workers wear masks and maintain their distance to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

From next week, so-called intelligent cameras will be installed in five strategic points in the offices of Belgian rail infrastructure operator Infrabel, where technicians would normally come together, such as the cafeteria.

A warning will sound if people are too numerous, do not have a face mask or get too close.

“We must ensure that our staff complies with the various social distancing guidelines. This is why we are setting up a number of devices based on artificial intelligence,” Benoit Gilson, Infrabel’s strategy director, told Reuters on Monday.

Using AI software available online, Infrabel said it had developed a way to interpret camera images for the purpose of COVID-19 protection. The company will employ an algorithm to calculate if workers are too close or wearing a face mask.

In a demonstration on Monday, staff seen on camera were shown on a giant screen as stick figures whose distance apart could be measured in metres. On another screen, a camera detected if a worker entering a room was wearing a mask.

“The whole issue of distance (between individuals) is (managed by) a mathematical model that we developed,” said Daniel Degueldre, head of Infrabel’s information technology team.

The company, which has 11,000 employees, said it had already been working on ways to use sensors to protect technicians working on the Belgian railways by placing cameras on helmets that would alert staff in an accident.

That know-how was reappraised to fight coronavirus.

Responsible for Belgium’s 3,602 km (2,238 miles) of rail lines, Infrabel manages one of the World’s most dense rail networks.

Writing by Robin Emmott; Editing by Giles Elgood

Read More

Artificial intelligent Belgian rail tests sensors to keep workers apart during COVID-19

Artificial intelligent

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Belgium’s railways are testing smart cameras with sensors to ensure its workers wear masks and maintain their distance to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

From next week, so-called intelligent cameras will be installed in five strategic points in the offices of Belgian rail infrastructure operator Infrabel, where technicians would normally come together, such as the cafeteria.

A warning will sound if people are too numerous, do not have a face mask or get too close.

“We must ensure that our staff complies with the various social distancing guidelines. This is why we are setting up a number of devices based on artificial intelligence,” Benoit Gilson, Infrabel’s strategy director, told Reuters on Monday.

Using AI software available online, Infrabel said it had developed a way to interpret camera images for the purpose of COVID-19 protection. The company will employ an algorithm to calculate if workers are too close or wearing a face mask.

In a demonstration on Monday, staff seen on camera were shown on a giant screen as stick figures whose distance apart could be measured in metres. On another screen, a camera detected if a worker entering a room was wearing a mask.

“The whole issue of distance (between individuals) is (managed by) a mathematical model that we developed,” said Daniel Degueldre, head of Infrabel’s information technology team.

The company, which has 11,000 employees, said it had already been working on ways to use sensors to protect technicians working on the Belgian railways by placing cameras on helmets that would alert staff in an accident.

That know-how was reappraised to fight coronavirus.

Responsible for Belgium’s 3,602 km (2,238 miles) of rail lines, Infrabel manages one of the World’s most dense rail networks.

Writing by Robin Emmott; Editing by Giles Elgood

Read More

Artificial intelligent Alibaba group holding to invest 10 billion yuan in artificial intelligent system

Artificial intelligent

artificial intelligent

FILE PHOTO – A staff member sits next to smart speaker Tmall Genie during a demonstration to the media inside a room of Alibaba Group’s futuristic FlyZoo hotel in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Xihao Jiang

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – Alibaba Group Holding Ltd will invest 10 billion yuan ($1.41 billion) into an AI (artificial intelligence) and IoT (Internet of Things) system centered around its Tmall Genie smart speaker, the company announced on Wednesday.

The announcement comes as the e-commerce giant continues its push into new technologies and business sectors beyond online shopping.

The money will be used to add more content to Tmall Genie, as well as develop proprietary technology, Alibaba said.

It launched the first model of Tmall Genie in 2017.

Like the Amazon Echo, which is not for sale in China, the smart speaker can interact with users via a voice interface to play music, give out weather information, and perform other functions.

The company has released several models since then, including devices with displays. Its latest model, announced on Wednesday, costs 549 yuan ($77.28) and comes with a 10-inch screen.

Alibaba competes with Xiaomi Corp and Baidu Inc in the smart speaker sector.

In 2019, Alibaba shipped 16.8 million smart speakers to consumers, while Baidu shipped 17.3 million, according to research firm Canalys.

($1 = 7.1043 Chinese yuan renminbi)

Reporting by Josh Horwitz, editing by Louise Heavens and Jason Neely

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Artificial intelligent Alibaba group holding to invest 10 billion yuan in artificial intelligent system

Artificial intelligent

artificial intelligent

FILE PHOTO – A staff member sits next to smart speaker Tmall Genie during a demonstration to the media inside a room of Alibaba Group’s futuristic FlyZoo hotel in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Xihao Jiang

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – Alibaba Group Holding Ltd will invest 10 billion yuan ($1.41 billion) into an AI (artificial intelligence) and IoT (Internet of Things) system centered around its Tmall Genie smart speaker, the company announced on Wednesday.

The announcement comes as the e-commerce giant continues its push into new technologies and business sectors beyond online shopping.

The money will be used to add more content to Tmall Genie, as well as develop proprietary technology, Alibaba said.

It launched the first model of Tmall Genie in 2017.

Like the Amazon Echo, which is not for sale in China, the smart speaker can interact with users via a voice interface to play music, give out weather information, and perform other functions.

The company has released several models since then, including devices with displays. Its latest model, announced on Wednesday, costs 549 yuan ($77.28) and comes with a 10-inch screen.

Alibaba competes with Xiaomi Corp and Baidu Inc in the smart speaker sector.

In 2019, Alibaba shipped 16.8 million smart speakers to consumers, while Baidu shipped 17.3 million, according to research firm Canalys.

($1 = 7.1043 Chinese yuan renminbi)

Reporting by Josh Horwitz, editing by Louise Heavens and Jason Neely

Read More

Artificial intelligent On this day: Born April 13, 1963; Russian chess champion Garry Kasparov

Artificial intelligent

(Reuters) – Garry Kasparov hated losing but in defeat, to an “alien opponent” incapable of fear or the faintest flicker of emotion, the youngest of chess champions and greatest of grandmasters made history.

artificial intelligent

FILE PHOTO: Born on April 13, 1963: Garry Kasparov, Russian Chess Grandmaster World chess champion Garry Kasparov plays his first move of game two of the match against the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. The Russian grandmaster, who won game one May 3, will play six games against Deep Blue in a rematch of their first contest in 1996, New York, U.S. May 4, 1997. REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo

The Russian’s 1996 and 1997 man vs machine matches against Deep Blue, an IBM RS/6000 supercomputer capable of crunching 200 million positions in the space of a second, wrote headlines around the World.

Although Kasparov won the February 1996 match in Philadelphia, his faceless foe took the opening game in a watershed moment for artificial intelligence and 20th century technology.

The computer, playing with the advantage of the white pieces, forced the Russian to resign on the 37th move after surrounding his king.

It was the first time a computer program had ever beaten a reigning chess World champion under classic tournament rules, where players have hours to plan their strategies.

Kasparov sat on a raised platform opposite a video display terminal as a programmer received the moves over the internet from New York.

The second encounter held over nine days in a New York skyscraper, with Deep Blue’s software upgraded, was declared “The Brain’s Last Stand” by Newsweek magazine.

“The computer is an alien opponent and the characteristics of this opponent are very, very different from any human opponent,” Kasparov, then 34, had told reporters.

The swashbuckling Russian won the first game but cracked under pressure on May 11, 1997, the computer clinching the match with two wins, three draws and one loss.

“In brisk and brutal fashion, the IBM computer Deep Blue unseated humanity, at least temporarily, as the finest chess playing entity on the planet,” reported the New York Times.

“One small step for a computer, one giant leap backward for mankind?,” asked the Wall Street Journal.

SOCIAL EXPERIMENT

Kasparov later said he had treated the $1.1 million event as a great scientific and social experiment but Deep Blue, whose two towers soon became museum pieces, proved “anything but intelligent”.

“The way Deep Blue played offered no input in the mysteries of human intelligence,” he told the DefCon hackers’ conference in a 2017 keynote address. “It was as intelligent as your alarm clock.

“Although losing to a $10 million alarm clock didn’t make me feel any better.”

Born Garik Kimovich Weinstein in Baku, now the capital of Azerbaijan, Kasparov adopted his mother’s surname at a young age after his father’s death.

He became a grandmaster at 17 and World champion at 22 in 1985 when the charismatic youngster beat Soviet establishment hero Anatoly Karpov.

The first match in Moscow between the two in 1984-85 lasted more than five months and was abandoned on health grounds after a record 40 drawn games, with Kasparov coming back from 5-0 down to 5-3.

Kasparov formed the short-lived Professional Chess Association in 1993, then retired as a professional in 2005.

A fierce critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, he played an active role in the anti-Kremlin opposition protest movement when he lived in Moscow and even tried to run for the presidency.

In 2012 he became chairman of the New York-based Human Rights Foundation, succeeding former Czech president Vaclav Havel.

Reporting by Alan Baldwin, editing by Ed Osmond

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